A simple guide to food safety

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Posted on: 06 June 2018 by Morgan Franklin

If you’ve been preparing and cooking food for a long time, it’s easy to get complacent about food safety, after all we should know what we’re doing by now! Unfortunately, the reality is that around 76 million Americans suffer from food-related illness every year.

If you’ve been preparing and cooking food for a long time, it’s easy to get complacent about food safety, after all we should know what we’re doing by now! Unfortunately, the reality is that around 76 million Americans suffer from food-related illness every year.

Even if you’ve been around the block a few times, it's never too late to pick up a few tips on  food safety, particularly if you have kids or grandkids to look after.

1. Check food packaging

It is easy to assume that with the size, scale and facilities of modern supermarkets, that all groceries on sale will be in tip-top condition. Despite this, it is still important to inspect your groceries before buying.

You should check food packaging hasn’t been broken or compromised (particularly fresh products with film lids), and that loose fruit and veg is in good condition, avoiding those with pierced skins.

Checking meat products for discolouration is also essential, as meat that doesn’t quite look right may indicate poor handling or a product that is no longer fresh.

2. Shopping in the right order

Supermarkets are laid out in a specific way, usually to maximise sales as well as convenience for the shopper. Unfortunately, this often comes at the expense of food safety.

Fresh produce like fruit and veg are usually placed at the front of stores, but by picking up these items first and placing them at the bottom of your basket or cart, it is easy for heavier items to damage and compromise fresh produce when it is stacked on top.

It’s also important to pick up chilled and frozen goods at the end of your shop, to ensure they don’t warm up.

3. Refrigerator organisation

The way food is stored at home is very important, with different types of produce having specific requirements to stay fresh and safe. As such, it is important to organise your fridge properly. Start by storing meat products on the shelf below dairy, to avoid dripping.

Veggies should be stored differently, depending on what type they are. Veg that rots should be stored in low humidity, while food that wilts need a much higher humidity to thrive.

4. Using your chopping boards

Using one chopping board to prep a single meal is understandable, particularly if you’re not blessed with a big kitchen and plenty of worktop space. It is, however, important to avoid cross-contamination between raw meat and other ingredients to ensure you are cooking safely.

Separate chopping boards are important, as is picking boards made from the correct material. Wood will absorb meat juices and bacteria, so meat products should be prepared on glass or plastic boards.

5. Understanding raw milk

Pasteurisation is an important part of the dairy process, as it ensures that products are safe to consume. Not all dairy sold in shops is pasteurised though, with ‘raw milk’ products, such as manchego, containing more bacteria.

This doesn’t mean they are unsafe to eat, but you should certainly eat raw milk products in moderation. If in doubt, check the label, which will tell you whether a product is made from raw milk - otherwise there is nothing to worry about!

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Candiss man posted 07 February 2019

L’azienda può sempre contatre su di noi. Siamo pronti ad intervenire per ottenere i risultati voluti. consulenza sicurezza sul lavoro in milano


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